T5W | Books As Video Games

Welcome one, welcome all, to ‘Emma Remembers Top 5 Wednesdays Exists And Decides To Join In’… again. Top 5 Wednesday is a weekly meme/challenge which was created by the wonderful Lainey from gingereadslainey and is now overseen by the equally lovely Sam from Thoughts of Tomes. Every Wednesday, participants devise their Top 5 based on a given topic.

This Wednesday’s topic is Books That Would Make Good Video Games. Given Sam’s penchant for video games, I can understand that this topic comes from a place of deep love for that genre but I’m not really much of a gamer myself… principally because I suck at them. So, my top five comes with the caveat that I don’t really know how viable any of these would be when translating them into the video game genre – I just happen to think they could make pretty damn cool games to play. Let’s see what we have…

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Top Ten Tuesday | Books I’d Like to See Under the Tree

It’s yet another Tuesday, so that means another Top Ten Tuesday. For those who don’t know, Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme created by the book bloggers and list lovers, The Broke and the Bookish, and each week they post a topic for bloggers to respond to.

This week’s theme is Ten Books I Wouldn’t Mind Santa Leaving Under My Tree (or non-book bookworm items). Handily, these past few years I’ve come to an arrangement with my parents that they will transfer money into my bank account with which I will then proceed to buy books/DVDs off my Amazon wishlist to my heart’s content/as long as the money holds up. Then they take them all away (booo) and wrap them up (yaay) and we pretend I don’t know what I’m getting for Christmas when really I picked them all out myself. It’s a good system, I’m very grateful for it, and it’s one I recommend in fact!

Because of it, by every November I well and truly have a Wish List of books all ready and bookmarked for when my mum starts talking about my Christmas gifts… so this Top Ten Tuesday isn’t too difficult. Those books (this year) only account for about 3 or 4 things though, so we have to hope that the rest of my family/friends are psychic, or they consult Santa on what I told him I was interested in. I think fingers need to be well and truly crossed there! Here are my Top Ten Books I’d Like to See Under the Tree this Christmas! (If they’re not methinks some Amazon shopping will be on the cards on 26th December!)

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Top Ten Tuesday | Books Added To My TBR Recently

toptentuesdayIt’s yet another Tuesday, so that means another Top Ten Tuesday. For those who don’t know, Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme created by the book bloggers and list lovers, The Broke and the Bookish, and each week they post a topic for bloggers to respond to.

This week’s theme is Top Ten Books I’ve Added To My To-Be-Read List Lately. I’m a fiend for shoving books merrily onto my TBR shelf on Goodreads with little to no regard of just how ridiculous and overwhelming that list has become. I’ve looked through that list and picked out a few (well, ten) that I actually consciously remember adding to my TBR list and I’m definitely excited to acquire these in the (hopefully near) future.

    1. Strange the Dreamer – Laini Taylor (x)
      I adored Laini Taylor’s Daughter of Smoke and Bone, though I’ve yet to read the other books in that trilogy, but this one sounds amazing. I mean, come on, the synopsis includes the following phrases: ‘the aftermath of a war between gods and men’, ‘a young librarian with a singular dream’, and ‘friendship and treachery, love and carnage’.
    2. His Bloody Project – Graeme Macrae Burnet (x)
      This one came onto my radar as it was Shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize this year. I hear it’s about a brutal triple murder and a probably/definitely guilty man. Somehow that seems enough information to decide I should read this book.
    3. Rebel Mechanics (Rebel Mechanics #1) – Shanna Swendson (x)
      I found this one whilst searching for steampunk novels on Goodreads lists; I wanted to see what was already out there because my NaNoWriMo novel this year probably falls into that genre. This one is set in the US though, so it’s entirely different, but has some concepts which similarly feature in mine. The synopsis has completely sold me on this novel: ‘A sixteen-year-old governess becomes a spy in this alternative U.S. history where the British control with magic and the colonists rebel by inventing […] Magisters have always ruled the colonies, but now an underground society of mechanics and engineers are developing non-magical sources of power via steam engines that they hope will help them gain freedom from British rule.’
    4. The Forgetting – Sharon Cameron (x)
      I have no idea where or when I found this novel, but I do know that when I was browsing my TBR shelf again, I definitely wanted to read this thanks to the synopsis. ‘What isn’t written, isn’t remembered. Even your crimes. […] every twelve years the city descends into the bloody chaos of the Forgetting, a day of no remorse, when each person’s memories – of parents, children, love, life, and self – are lost. Unless they have been written’.
    5. Our Dark Duet (Monsters of Verity #2) – V.E. Schwab (x)
      I love VE Schwab’s books and This Savage Song was no exception so obviously I’m highly anticipating the next book in the duology – Our Dark Duet. I kind of love that people are writing duologies to be honest, because I’m getting more than a little sick of people writing fantasy trilogies, and I think this one actually sounds worthwhile.
    6. A Million Worlds with You (Firebird #3) – Claudia Gray (x)
      I really adored the first book in this trilogy, A Thousand Pieces of You, because I loved the concept of a person being able to inhabit alternative-universe versions of themselves and have to learn about this new identity whilst not giving the game away to those around them. I find that a really interesting idea so, even though I haven’t got to the second book yet, I’m definitely wanting to read this book.
    7. The Hammer of Thor (Magnus Chase and the Gods of Asgard #2) – Rick Riordan (x)
      I love renditions of Norse mythology (I think everyone knows I’m a huge MCU Loki fan, no surprises here) and Magnus Chase is no exception to this. I wasn’t much a fan of Rick Riordan’s books relating to Greek mythology when I tried the Percy Jackson series before, but I really liked the first book in this Gods of Asgard series. Don’t get me wrong, it’s so so dumb but it’s pure entertainment, and I love it for that. I mean just look at this synopsis: ‘Thor’s hammer is missing again. The thunder god has a disturbing habit of misplacing his weapon–the mightiest force in the Nine Worlds.’
    8. Norse Mythology – Neil Gaiman (x)
      It’s Neil Gaiman’s take on Norse mythology… do I need to say any more? Didn’t think so.
    9. The Dark Days Pact (Lady Helen #2) – Alison Goodman (x)
      The first book in this series introduced Lady Helen, a young lady who primarily worries about being presented to society and the appropriate etiquette at balls but then realises there’s a seedy demonic underbelly to the London society she inhabits. Basically, think Jane Austen plus Buffy the Vampire Slayer. As you can see from my review, I loved the idea – it was like Alison Goodman had tapped into my brain and provided it with just what it needed.
    10. A Conjuring of Light (Shades of Magic #3) – V.E. Schwab (x)
      I adore VE Schwab’s books, as previously mentioned, but my true obsession in her works is the Shades of London series. Parallel Londons, dimension hopping magicians, a flirty Prince, a pirate captain, a kickass heroine, what more could you want? I am both eagerly anticipating and am terrified of what this third and final book will bring – I know Schwab can and will kill her darlings.

That was my Top Ten Tuesday featuring some of recent additions to my TBR list.
Do any of these books feature on your Top Ten TBR list? What books have you added to your TBR list lately?

Comment below/link your own post below if you have one – I’d love to read it!


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T5W | Fictional Items I Want

top 5 wednesdayAfter a few weeks of no-shows for Top 5 Wednesday, I am firmly back on the bandwagon. For those who are unaware, Top 5 Wednesday is a weekly meme/challenge organised by the wonderful Lainey, in which participants devise their Top 5 books based on a given topic – because who doesn’t love a good list?

This week’s topic is ‘Fictional Items You Want’. So, this week, I will be choosing the top 5 fictional items that I would love to own, if only fiction were a reality. (It won’t surprise anyone to learn that when brainstorming a list I initially came up with several from Harry Potter!) You can find them below in ascending order, though of course I wouldn’t turn my nose up at any of them!


5. Gansey’s journal (from Maggie Stiefvater’s The Raven Cycle quartet)

 “More than anything, the journal wanted. It wanted more than it could hold, more than words could describe, more than diagrams could illustrate. Longing burst from the pages, in every frantic line and every hectic sketch and every dark-printed definition. There was something pained and melancholy about it.”

Unsurprisingly, I love Richard Gansey III and his slightly crazed obsession with Glendower. It’s because of this that I would love to own the culmination of all his genius (and crazy) which is embodied by his leather journal in which he keeps all his thoughts and research from his search for the Welsh king. As Blue observes when she finds it, it belongs to someone who doesn’t just want to quickly keep track of the information he finds, but who also loves the process of the research itself, something which I can sympathise with after having a hell of a good (if stressful) time whilst researching and writing my BA and MA dissertations.

4. The Iron Throne (from George R.R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire series)

“Have you ever seen the Iron Throne? The barbs along the back, the ribbons of twisted steel, the jagged ends of swords and knives all tangled up and melted? It is not a comfortable seat, ser. Aerys cut himself so often men took to calling him King Scab, and Maegor the Cruel was murdered in that chair. […] It is not a seat where a man can rest at ease.” 

As much as the amount of bloodshed around it is terrifying, and I’d probably do something about putting a nice cushion on it so it was less stabby to sit on, I’d love to own the Iron Throne… and I’m sure my reaction to owning it would go something like when Leslie gifts Ben a replica of it on Parks and Rec. 

3. The Firebird device (from Claudia Gray’s Firebird series)

“The Firebirds glinted in his palm. They looked like odd, asymmetrical bronze lockets – maybe jewelry fashioned in the era of Art Nouveau, when organic shapes were all the rage. One of the metals inside was rare enough that it could only be mind in a single valley in the whole world, but anyone who didn’t know better would just think they were pretty. Instead the Firebirds were the keys to unlock the universe. No – the universes.

Who wouldn’t want the ability to travel between times, locations, and dimensions? I’d use Marguerite Caine as a cautionary tale, of course, and ignore the swathe of practical and ethical issues raised by such dimension hopping into, essentially, other people’s bodies. If I wound up in the Russia Marguerite ends up, with a certain Russian captain, that would be acceptable too, minus any threats against my life, obviously.

2. Pensieve (from J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series)

 

 

“One simply siphons the excess thoughts from one’s mind, pours them into the basin, and examines them at one’s leisure.”

 

Memories and thoughts are so temporal and fleeting, it’s a constant source of frustration. The Pensieve is, simply put, a genius idea, and if it existed it would be so incredibly useful. Anything that grapples with the concept of being able to harness or solidify or bottle up memories is one which always captures my attention, so it’s unsurprising that when I first read about Dumbledore’s Pensieve I immediately warmed to the idea of it. Also, who doesn’t love a nice bit of punning wordplay?

1. Babel fish (from Douglas Adams’ Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy series)

“Meanwhile, the poor Babel fish, by effectively removing all barriers to communication between different races and cultures, has caused more and bloodier wars than anything else in the history of creation.”

I speak Spanish, not very well, though allegedly my level is at a professional working capacity – ha. One thing that has always frustrated me, however, is that I am not brilliant at language learning, and I truly envy those that are – those insanely clever people who are fluent in more than just their native language, I have a hell of a lot of respect for them. So, of course, I would like the cheat’s way out – and that is the Babel fish! The opportunities that universal language acquisition could provide are wonderful and I think I’m slightly more optimistic than Douglas Adams because I don’t foresee quite as many wars as he does!


Do you have a Top 5 Wednesday list for this week? Share below, I’d love to check it out. Alternatively, perhaps leave a comment of what fictional objects you would love to own.