Friday Reads | 22nd December 2017

Welcome one, welcome all, to quite a late and impromptu Friday Reads. I’ve just got home from a meal with some of my school friends from back home so it’s safe to say that this is going to be brief.

It’s getting to be crunch time with my reading goals for 2017 – there’s not much of this year left and I’m so determined to finish at least one reading challenge, namely the Around the year in 52 Books challenge. So my reading right now is completely dominated by the remaining challenges I need to complete for that, and I’m doing reasonably well in ticking them off. Since posting my December TBR, I’ve made sure to prioritise reading things that will fulfil the challenges, specifically Jo Nesbo’s The Bat and Liane Moriarty’s Big Little Lies, the latter of which pleasantly surprised me and I thoroughly enjoyed it. This is the very reason that I like doing reading challenges that persuade me to read outside of my normal genre which, let’s face it, is either fantasy or historical fiction. Speaking of…

At the moment I’m reading (well rereading) Marie Rutkoski’s The Winner’s Kiss, the first book in the Winner’s Trilogy of which I hope to finally get to Books 2 and 3 in 2018. It also handily fulfils the challenge of reading a book recommended by a favourite author because VE Schwab has rated the trilogy highly on Goodreads. I’m currently also reading Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol. Again, this is a reread as I’ve studied this before at University, but it’s nice to read it again just for pleasure. Plus it’s definitely the right time of year for it. It’s not very long at all and I’m reading it here and there on my phone so I expect to finish it soon enough. I’m also planning to read Jane Austen’s Lady Susan as this will fit with the epistolary novel prompt and Kendare Blake’s Three Dark Crowns which will fulfil the ‘Read a book from What Should I Read Next’ since it was recommended for lovers of Six of Crows.

All in all, I’d like to think I can still complete this challenges but I have noticed a massive drop in my reading pace since coming home for Christmas. As I’m not travelling into/home from work every day, I don’t have that guaranteed minimum of 30 minutes of reading daily, so I have to sit down and actively plan to read instead. I’m not brilliant at doing this when there’s the distraction of family and Christmas things but hopefully I can pull my socks up this weekend before Christmas and get some good reading done. Everyone loves a trier, right?

What are you reading this Friday and into this weekend? Do you have any festive themed reading plans? Have you completed any yearly reading challenges? Let me know what you’re reading at the moment in the comments below because I’d love to hear it!


Goodreads Twitter Tumblr Instagram

Advertisements

Friday Reads | 8th December 2017

As you might remember from my Taking Stock/December TBR post, I took a look at the remaining challenges I had left to complete for the Around the Year in 52 Books reading challenge and I devised a (loose) TBR for the remainder of the year to fulfil all of the remaining prompts. I’m happy to report I’ve stuck to the TBR, but I’m making less progress than I probably should have, which is a shame. So I thought I’d do a quick Friday Reads post today in order to track where I’m at/shame myself for not having read more of my December TBR yet.

Recently Finished

gravemercyYesterday I finished reading Grave Mercy by Robin LaFevers and I really enjoyed it! It also fits for week 9’s AtY challenge ‘book in the middle of your TBR’ so that’s a nice bonus, after the initial appealing premise that this is about a convent of assassin nuns who serve the god of death, known as St Mortain. I mean come on who wouldn’t want to read about nuns murdering people? I must admit that, at first, I wasn’t wholly enamoured with it because it’s told in first person present tense which can be quite jarring when you first start to read it and notice that it’s all happening in present tense. However, I quickly got used to the narrative style and started to feel properly immersed in the storyline and the politics of the court of Brittany.

I’m a little sad to discover that the next two books in the series actually aren’t a traditional ‘series’ but are companion novels focusing on different characters which were mentioned in this first book – I wanted to hear more about Ismae and Duval! The jury is still out on whether I’ll bother with the other two books or if I’ll just leave it at this one.

Continue reading

Currently Reading/Watching | 1st December

You may have noticed, my blogging has slowed down. Why? No real reason, to be honest, apart from the fact that I’m lazy and right now I’d rather consume the culture (be it films, TV, or books) than write content about it. I go through phases, my blogging mojo will undoubtedly (read: hopefully) pick back up again soon but, for now, I thought I would mention a few things I’m currently reading and watching, in case anyone is curious or looking for something new to try!

Currently Reading

 

The Grisha trilogy by Leigh Bardugo

In November, I read quite a fair bit (my monthly wrap-up will follow shortly) and I’ve recently finished (re)reading The Grisha trilogy by Leigh Bardugo, which consists of Shadow and Bone, Siege and Storm, and Ruin and Rising. Since I read and adored Six of Crows/Crooked Kingdom, I knew I wanted to re-read the original Grisha trilogy to revisit the world of Ravka and see if reading the later duology enhanced the reading experience of the first trilogy and so on.

I’m happy to report that it did, a lot, in fact, and I really enjoyed my re-read of the series. Book two, Siege and Storm still remains my favourite because of reasons (cough Nikolai cough) but I ended up enjoying the whole thing a lot more than I did the first time I read it. In fact, I find Alina less unbearable of a narrator now, and I don’t hate Mal himself nearly as much as I did on my first read (I still hate the ship, though). My love for the Darkling endures, naturally.

Although I’m going to try to read something else now, I am very, very tempted to use this as an excuse to re-read Six of Crows and Crooked Kingdom and maybe then I’ll be able to read The Language of Thorns, to perfectly finish off my re-reading of the Grishaverse and to get excited for The King of Scars, even though that book’s release is some way away still! We shall see…

Continue reading

Friday Reads | 19th May 2017

Another week, another Friday rolls around. You may remember in my last Friday Reads, I was still absorbed in the weird and wonderful world of Neil Gaiman’s American Gods (a review of which will be up later today) and having quite the run of longer books.

In wanting to break away from that I decided to pick up what I thought was the most fun and fluffy of the books I felt like reading – Gail Carriger’s Soullessthe first book in The Parasol Protectorate, her steampunk paranormal series in which vampires and werewolves are part of Queen Victoria’s society and, indeed, her government. The heroine, Alexia Tarabotti, is “soulless”, an individual whose touch can reverse supernatural states, so, if say, she touches a werewolf, their fur disappears and their eyes become a little less wolfish. The hero of the piece? Well, he’s an Earl, Lord Connal Maccon, a gentleman (kind of), he occasionally slips into his Scottish burr, and he’s obviously an Alpha of a werewolf pack because this part paranormal romance so of course he is. He’s also gruff and he and Alexia argue a lot so we can all see where that’s headed from the moment of their very first tiff in the book.

But, hey, it’s a fun romp, it’s very diverting and it’s steampunk so I am all over that … the one thing that slightly disrupts my otherwise easy reading pace? You can kind of tell it’s written by someone who isn’t, themselves, English. There are very subtle differences between British English and American English that most people don’t realise until they write with someone from the other nation – by which I mean, I myself have come to terms with this only through writing forum roleplay with an American who found it forever amusing that I would say things like “fortnight” (apparently that’s not used generally as a word in America??) and “half an hour” instead of “a half hour” as others might say. Little nuances like that that are difficult to handle correctly (mostly because you’re not aware of them being nuances) and you’re bound to slip up.

Although, one stonker of a mistake in the first few pages: “jelly” was used to describe what we English call “jam” (you know the stuff you spread on toast and scones?)… I just cringed at how glaringly obvious it stood out. (I bought the book used and the previous owner had angrily circled the word “jelly” in pencil – they clearly took issue with it too!) The more I re-read this book the more I notice them, and that’s what probably means I’m struggling a bit with this book. Lord Maccon, in particular, says things that just… no – even if he’s meant to be Scottish, they’re not Scottish, they’re not even English, couple of case in points:

“How on earth did you finagle that?” (Um excuse me, what’s “finagle”?)

“What in tarnation is that?” (We don’t say tarnation, sorry Lord Maccon)

Of course, really, it’s a book about vampires and werewolves so I mean if I’m already suspending disbelief for them then I can let a few language issues go and just enjoy it. Or, I hope I can let it go anyway because the whole point of re-read the first book was so that I could swiftly continue on with the series ahead and get to Changeless, Blameless, Heartless, and Timeless in quick succession. I’m also kind of hoping that after the first book someone might have pointed out the more blatant Americanisms and they were corrected. We shall see.

(Wow ok I didn’t realise how long this post is getting… apparently that rant about British English needed to be expressed or I would have burst.)

But, aside from everything that is The Parasol Protectorate, I also have a digital pile of eARCs to get to as soon as possible. Yes, my friends, I finally discovered NetGalley and was astounded to learn that I did have enough online presence to be approved for some titles after all. (Is it weird I find that strangely flattering?) I’ve already took advantage of that and got my grubby little mitts on Matt Haig’s How to Stop Time and bloody loved it – I have such love for Matt Haig’s writing in general, to be fair, so it wasn’t a hard sell – but I think I’ll be re-reading it before writing a review for it, since it doesn’t come out until July. Aside from that I also have these titles to choose from this weekend:

  

  • Rotherweird by Andrew Caldecott
    This just sounds odd and mysterious and I’m all for that. I hear it’s a bit Victorian and a bit Gothic in its tone, and that’s plenty enough to intrigue me. The cover is intriguing and Hilary Mantel has praised it. That’s all I know, that’s all I want to know.
  • Standard Deviation by Katherine Heiny
    I’m 17% through this and I’m not really old enough to appreciate the topics it covers, I think, but I’ll still try to finish it for the sake of reviewing it because it’s an easy enough reading experience. There are 4 and 5-star reviews of this on Goodreads so clearly I’m in the minority here.
  • Spellslinger by Sebastien de Castell
    ‘Magic is a con game’ – that’s quite enough of a PR selling phrase to grab me, hook, line, and sinker. Yes, I am that easy.

Yeah, I have a lot of reading to do, especially since 2 out of 3 of these books have been already released so I’m definitely behind. But I have little to no plans for this upcoming weekend currently so hopefully I can breeze through a couple of the books from this list – fingers crossed anyway! The galleys really ought to be my priority and they will be, provided I don’t get distracted by whatever shenanigans Alexia and Lord Maccon get up to in The Parasol Protectorate books!

That was my Friday Reads for this week but enough of me – what are you currently reading going into this weekend? Are you planning much for the next couple of days? Let me know in the comments below, I’d love to hear it!


Goodreads | Twitter | Tumblr | Instagram | Bloglovin’

Friday Reads | 5th May 2017

Well guys, not to sound like a broken record here but it’s the end of another working week which means it is high time for another Friday Reads in which I will discuss the book I’m currently reading and my bookish plans going into this upcoming weekend.

I haven’t done a Friday Reads in a few weeks (my last one was back in March, yikes!), mainly because I was battling through A Feast for Crows for what felt like for-ev-er but in reality was only a fortnight or so but, believe me, I felt every single minute of that time. Which is weird because I actually ended up really enjoying this fourth volume in the A Song of Ice and Fire series. It’s safe to say that this book is very politics heavy… there aren’t a lot of action scenes (especially not compared to the bloodshed that takes place in the previous books) but everything feels very calculated and conniving and you just know that though the characters aren’t actively moving from one place to the other they are moving their little pawns all over the board in the hopes of gaining the upper hand. All of this is why I ended up loving the book, as I was sure I would if I just stuck with it. People are right, though, if you’re in it for the political machinations of the Tyrells and the Lannisters and their scheming at King’s Landing, then this volume could well be your favourite, but if you’re more so in it for Jon Snow and his brothers on the Wall, well, I hate to spoil things but he doesn’t even make an appearance in this one.

Now, I’m not enough of a masochist to move straight on to reading the next ASOIAF book, A Dance with Dragons, though I do really want to get to that soon so I don’t end up forgetting what is going on in this series. However, I am enough of a masochist to move from one mammoth of a book to another, this time with Neil Gaiman’s American Gods. I was so excited to hear of the TV show being developed, especially when Bryan Fuller was attached to it, because I knew it would turn out stunning. But (and it’s a big ‘but’) I would like to read the book in its entirety before I allow myself to watch the show on Amazon Prime. I’ve previously tried to read American Gods, both in paperback and via audiobook formats, but never got any further than the scene where Shadow and Wednesday visit Czernobog and the Zorya Sisters. (No, I categorically do not know what it is about that scene that’s a sticking point for me because it’s really good so why on earth I stop at it each time I do not know for the life of me.) Anyway, I need to properly commit to this and give it another chance because I love Neil Gaiman’s writing and I’m sure I will adore this once I get fully invested in the storyline. It features gods and mythology after all – I am all over that crap.

At the time of writing this post, I can officially state that I have now read further than I ever did before (i.e. past that scene with the Zorya sisters) so I am hopeful that the rest of today and this weekend will bring even more progress on American Gods. I would certainly like to be a chunk of it through the novel by Monday, so maybe then I can allow myself to watch the first episode of the TV show since it premiered this past Monday.

Aside from that, I don’t anticipate reading much of anything else in the coming days. This past week was the start of my new job so I’ve been a big ol’ ball of anxiety and, you know what guys? That’s tiring as hell. So this weekend had better be full of a lot of not doing much or I will end up very grumpy indeed. Liz and I are planning a Tavern breakfast and that is the full extent of my plans for this weekend. Sounds good to me to be honest, I’m well in need of a very low-key weekend and a rest. Let’s hope a good chunk of reading happens amidst all that rest, eh?

That was my Friday Reads for this week but enough of me – what are you currently reading going into this weekend? Are you planning much for the next couple of days? Let me know in the comments below, I’d love to hear it!


Goodreads | Twitter | Tumblr | Instagram | Bloglovin’

Friday Reads | 31st March 2017

Well folks, the last Friday Reads I did I was saying that I couldn’t believe it was halfway through February and here we are at the end of March. Yep, that happened. So let’s just remain in a state of denial about the fact three whole months of 2017 have passed and focus instead on what books I’m currently reading and plan to read this weekend. Agreed? Agreed!

Smoke by Dan Vyleta

Imagine a world in which every bad thought you had was made visible. Where anger, hatred and envy appeared as a thick, infectious smoke pouring from your body, leaving soot on your skin. A society controlled by an elite who have learned to master their darkest desires. Thomas and Charlie are friends at a boarding school near Oxford, where the children of the rich and powerful are trained to be future leaders. Charlie is naturally good, but Thomas’s father was accused of a terrible crime, and Thomas fears that the same evil lies coiled inside him. Then, on a trip to London – a forbidden city shrouded in darkness – they learn all is not as it appears. So begins a quest to understand the truth about this world of smoke, soot and ash – and perhaps to change it. (source)

I have no idea what the hell is going on in this book… and I kind of love it for that. I was sold on it in the opening chapter when there was a posh boarding school full of repressed little school boys being “examined” by the prefect for their sins. If that sounds weird, it’s because it is. The academic in me is also super intrigued because it’s doing interesting things with corporeality and fluid bodies and basically the former MA student in me is clutching this book in delight. I’m sure that will continue today and into this weekend.

Hard Times by Charles Dickens

‘Facts alone are wanted in life’: the children at Mr Gradgrind’s school are sternly ordered to stifle their imaginations and pay attention only to cold, hard reality. They live in a smoky, troubled industrial town so entertainment is hard to come by and resentments run deep. The effects of Gradgrind’s teaching on his own children, Tom and Louisa, are particularly profound and leave them ill-equipped to deal with the unpredictable desires of the human heart. Luckily for them they have a friend in Sissy Jupe, the child of a circus clown, who retains her warm-hearted, compassionate nature despite the pressures around her. (source)

You know, I’m mildly surprised by how easy this is proving to be to read. I always find it’s more daunting to look at a Dickens book rather than just getting round to actually reading it. It helps that I picked the shortest Dickens book to read though, there’s no denying that fact. But the fact I can read this comfortably on a sometimes noisy train probably attests to how it isn’t too tricky to follow. I’m intrigued by this Dickens novel because I know very little about it, except for knowing Gradgrind as a character, and I’m being pleasantly surprised. The Northern industrial setting is also my bag… and Coketown is definitely Preston, right?

I’m likely to be doing a lot of reading today/this weekend since Liz is working this weekend and so I won’t be procrastinating by watching Friends with her. I’d also really like to get down to some good blogging and get caught up in all the reviews I need to write because that’s been playing on my mind for weeks now. In between that I’m sure I’ll find time to read, maybe even finish these two books? Is that too ambitious? Probably.

So, those are my likely reading plans for today and heading into the weekend ahead. Do you have any Friday Reads posts? Or perhaps just some fun plans for the weekend? Let me know in the comments!


Goodreads | Twitter | Tumblr | Instagram | Bloglovin’

Friday Reads | 17th February 2017

It’s here again, folks, it’s another Friday. Yes, another week has gone by – scary, isn’t it? I just refuse to believe it is more than halfway through February, I simply refuse. The days/weeks are going by far too quickly for my own liking. But, still, the world rolls on and we too must roll with it, and on that very fine note…

abhorsenAs you may have seen in my last Friday Reads post, I was making my way through re-reading the Old Kingdom trilogy by Garth Nix via listening to the audiobooks on my commute. That’s been going really well so this Friday I will be listening to Garth Nix’s Abhorsen, the third book in the trilogy. I’m almost finished and all hell has well and truly broken loose in the kingdom – excellent! The books are still narrated by Tim Curry and they are still equally as amazing as Sabriel.

I have also thoroughly enjoyed this experience of conducting a re-read by getting hold of the audiobook version – I would definitely recommend that to my fellow re-readers if you have the facility to buy or, of course, to borrow audiobooks from your library. It particularly works for me because it means that I can still re-read books without having to feel guilty that I’m spending all of my reading time on nostalgic re-reading instead of trying new books; instead I simply confine the re-read to a different format (whether you would choose ebook or audiobook) so my “main” physical book is a new one and I read that one when I’m not standing cramped on the train or walking to work.

Speaking of re-reading, who else is still a little happy and overwhelmed that Goodreads have finally (finally) put their brains to good use and given us the re-reading function we asked for? It sounds like it’s such a flippant thing but I’m pretty sure anyone who does re-read understands the pain of trying to accurately track reading without such a function. But now we don’t need to add random editions of the book to trick the system into counting it – there is a function, yay! But, I digress, back to the actual books themselves…

warandpeacecoverCan I really say I’m still currently reading Leo Tolstoy’s War and Peace? I’m not sure. I’ve stalled at 200 pages in because I read until the end of a “part” and then stopped – that was an amateur mistake. Much like how the NaNoWriMo forums advise you to finish a day’s writing mid-sentence so that you have somewhere to immediately pick your writing back up the next day, I should not have stopped at the end of a section of War and Peace and then picked up another book too.

I’m a polygamous reader as it is but I think it only really counts as polygamous reading if you are actually reading the multiple books, not just occasionally staring at one of them with a wistful sort of look as you remember that you haven’t read a word of it since last month. However, since I’m going home to visit my parents this weekend, I may try to force myself to kickstart reading this by only taking this book with me. I am sure this plan has some flaws but, hey, good intentions are all that counts in the end, right? Wish me luck? (I’ll certainly need it.)

So, those are my likely reading plans for today and heading into the weekend ahead. Do you have any Friday Reads posts? Or perhaps just some fun plans for the weekend? Let me know in the comments!


Goodreads | Twitter | Tumblr | Instagram | Bloglovin’

Friday Reads | 27th January 2017

Another Friday, another Friday Reads. Another week has gone by, folks, and the world keeps on turning on…

warandpeacecoverAs you may have seen in last week’s Friday Reads post, I foolishly decided to try reading Leo Tolstoy’s War and Peacebecause I’m a masochist, apparently. If I’m being honest, when I decided to set one of my 2017 Resolutions as ‘read 4 classics’, I wasn’t really intending to tackle long classics, as I know this tends to burn me out. However, I had an odd urge to just get over the intimidating nature of War and Peace and give it a try, so here I am, a week or two later, and only 200ish pages into it, but feeling rather good about myself despite that poor progress! So, needless to say, I’m still reading War and Peace this Friday and this upcoming weekend (and for many more weekends to come I should imagine!) and I’m actually really enjoying the story. Admittedly I am enjoying the “peace” bits more than the “war” bits but I expected that and I think that’s mainly down to my own horrendous lack of knowledge of Russian history, let alone military history, so I can’t really blame Tolstoy for my own failings!

sabrielAside from War and Peace, I’ve got into the habit of having my audiobook on-the-go be a re-read, mainly so that I don’t feel like I’m procrastinating reading new books in favour of re-reading old ones. I don’t know quite how that works considering I’m still devoting quite a bit of time to it, regardless of whether I am physically reading it or listening to it, but on a psychological level it seems to be working for me. (Shhh, don’t question the faulty logic!) So, my current audiobook is Sabriel by Garth Nix. I was delighted to find my library had this on Overdrive and borrowed it immediately. It’s read by Tim Curry who has a fantastic voice for audiobooks, and his voice is especially fitting for the character of Mogget the cat who is funny and condescending but also sneaky and maybe evil under the surface… Tim Curry’s voice just oozes that so the audiobook is proving to be great so far.

audacityofhopeAnd, because having two mediums of reading in-progress simply isn’t enough, I’ve also got an ebook on-the-go, as of lunchtime today. Unsurprisingly, politics is frustrating me lately (two words – Brexit… Trump), and that doesn’t look like it’s going to change anytime soon. I frequently shake my head in despair at the news headlines I’m hearing every single day; I just surreptitiously turned off the reception area’s TV in my workplace because I couldn’t stand listening to it any more. And because I am incapable of letting go, I decided to start reading Barack Obama’s The Audacity of Hope – one, because Obama; two, because that is an amazing title; three, because he’s a very eloquent writer; and, four because I don’t read nearly enough non-fiction. That seems like plenty of reason to give this a read, finally.

As far as this weekend in general goes, I cannot wait to be done with work for the week, it’s just been strangely busy with lots of little bitty things to get done, and that hasn’t left that much time for anything else. I am looking forward to closing the office door this afternoon and not thinking about it for a couple of days. Myself and Liz are gym-ing this afternoon after work so we’ll see if I can truly close that door and not think… hopefully being so knackered from the gym will aid that utter lack of thought!

My weekends are low-key as a rule but since Liz is off too (yay) we have a couple of outings planned – this weekend should include a Tavern breakfast and a trip to the cinema to finally see La La Land, both of which will be amazing. I’m hoping to get caught up on blog posts and reviews I need to upload too, so hopefully I can productively use my weekend and do those. We’ll see, though, I am notorious for doing next to nothing, if given the chance – watch this space…

So, those are my likely reading plans for today and heading into the weekend ahead. Do you have any Friday Reads posts? Or perhaps just some fun plans for the weekend? Let me know in the comments!


Goodreads | Twitter | Tumblr | Instagram | Bloglovin’

Friday Reads | 20th January 2017

Yes, I’m doing 2 Friday Reads posts in a row. Why? Well, to be honest, this week has been a bit just bitty… low level stuff has happened that made me not get the opportunity, or desire, to post. Also, mostly, I’m lazy. But here we are, another Friday, another weekend looming so let’s try and get life and blogging back on track, shall we?

In fact, whilst I’m here I’d like to mention a few very good things I’m excited about that happened this week.

Firstly… and let me take a breath to try not to scream in your face in excitement…

WE GOT HAMILTON TICKETS FOR THIS YEAR!

87fa8c29-3a5b-4098-9255-b28008789785Yes, my friends, I get to see Hamilton when it comes to the West End and I’m super excited that I can say I am officially seeing Hamilton in 2017. 2017 is already so much better than the shit show that was 2016. Needless to say, myself and Liz are now diligently memorising every single damn line. We’re tackling CD 2 and, let me tell you, CD 2 really teaches you political history, like relentlessly hits you in the face with it. But it also contains the room where it happens (the room where it happens… the room where it happens…) so, you know, we’re good.

The second good thing – Wicked is going on a UK tour again, so there’s a chance for me to finally see it, and it to not be a big trek to see it because, handily, it’s coming to Liverpool. I’ve never managed to see Wicked (not even illicitly on YouTube) but it’s a musical that I really want to see done, and done properly. I’m not really in a position to go to London to see it so the touring production will definitely do rather nicely. I haven’t managed to nab tickets yet since it’s only just been announced but I’m crossing my fingers and I am quietly hopeful.

So, yes, two very nice musical-related things have happened, which brightens up 2017. And now onto the present, and the very near future…

As Friday dawns I am wilfully ignoring The Event which is happening today, which is quite the feat given that rolling BBC News is constantly playing, right in my eye-line, at work. But I simply refuse to acknowledge it and instead will move onto better things – namely books.

You might have seen in my last Friday Reads post that I was reading Alexandra Bracken’s The Darkest Minds and listening to Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire on audiobook as a way of re-reading the series. The latter is still ongoing because that book is bloody huge. The former… well… let us just say me and The Darkest Minds did not get along. In fact, it was a DNF for me, and I did a review of it for Cuckoo Review which explains why I was so disappointed in this book. If you have any interest in that, you can read it over here, but be pre-warned, it is a critical review since I didn’t like the book.

Moving on… this week I decided, for no apparent reason, that as part of my Read More Damn Classics mission, I would tackle perhaps the most intimidating of classics first. Because that obviously makes complete logical sense for a girl who used to read such books at university but hasn’t really since as some kind of weird form of rebellion and liberation after graduating.

warandpeaceSo, I am currently reading (and I anticipate I will be for a long time) War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy. No, I’m not sure what moment of madness lead to this. But it’s happening. And do you know what? It actually isn’t that difficult, so far. I mean, true, I’m only 160 pages in, and it has taken me a week to get to that point, but I’m quietly optimistic I will stick with this one. I’ve put together a character list and have given it a tracker page in my bullet journal and everything – I’m all prepared.

(PS- A post regarding bullet journalling is in the works, obviously, because a person can’t just bullet journal and not take photos of their page layouts. I’m fairly sure it’s the law so stay tuned for that.)

But that’s all folks, that behemoth of a book up there is all I plan to read. Undoubtedly, when I am hit with the enormity of how many words War and Peace actually consists of, I’ll seek immediate gratification and mix up my reading by also picking up something like the A Series of Unfortunate Events books (my review/discussion of the Netflix series is in the works too!). But, until that point, it’s me and Tolstoy, that is my Friday Reads.


So, those are my likely reading plans for today and heading into the weekend ahead. Do you have any Friday Reads posts?

Or perhaps just some fun plans for the weekend? Or a new film release? (I haven’t seen La La Land yet but it’s happening soon-ish hopefully!) Let me know in the comments!


Goodreads | Twitter | Tumblr | Instagram | Bloglovin’

Friday Reads | 13th January 2017

Another week, another Friday, another Friday Reads. This one is a little special, however, since it’s my first of 2017. Happy 2017, here’s to (probably inevitably) more of the same… at least in terms of reading!

gofOn that note, I’m still reading/listening to the audiobook I was listening to in my previous Friday Reads back in December 2016 – Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire by JK Rowling. This is making many a morning train ride bearable, but it’s also a bloody long book, so progress seems quite slow going (and it feels it at times, too!). I’m about 58% of the way through and I’ve just experienced the hilarity that is The Yule Ball chapter. (Ron and Hermione’s argument is my favourite thing ever, ngl.) So onwards and upwards into the trials and tribulations of The Triwizard Tournament and I’m actually really looking forward to the second half of the book because, although I watch the film quite a lot, I don’t very often re-read Goblet of Fire, for obvious length-based reasons.

darkestmindsI’m also reading The Darkest Minds by Alexandra Bracken. I requested and was sent this to review for Cuckoo Review, a writing programme/website I’m part of (in my own small way), and my review is due on Monday so I really, really need to get cracking with finishing this book. I’m… enjoying it reasonably so far, I think. Actually, a lot of the reasons I’m not wholly invested in the story aren’t really the book’s fault so I’m not sure where I will stand on it in my review, to be honest – is it the book’s fault that I am kind of over the whole heroine-of-book’s POV in a dystopian world narrative? I’m not sure. And it’s going to make completing my review a little tricky but, hey, that’s sort of a challenge in and of itself. And it’s good to be challenged when reading/reviewing.

asouenetflixHaving said both of those things… I’m also very aware that today is the darkest of days – the day that Netflix drops A Series of Unfortunate Events! I haven’t been this excited for a TV show in a while (well, since the Gilmore Girls specials) and whilst it would be nice to sit here and pretend this weekend will be dedicated entirely to reading… I’d be lying through my teeth – I fully intend to carve out a large block of time to snuggle up and not move for (hopefully) hours whilst I watch ASOUE. Likewise, me and Liz keep putting off going outside after work in order to go to the cinema and see Assassin’s Creed, but it’s now showing at a small local cinema and its proximity and cheaper price makes it an appealing offer ahead of the Odeon in town, and we should be seeing it sometime this weekend. And that sounds like a pretty damn ideal weekend to me!


So, those are my likely reading plans for today and heading into the weekend ahead. Do you have any Friday Reads posts?

Or perhaps just some fun plans for the weekend? Are you excited for A Series of Unfortunate Events like I am? Or perhaps a new film release? Let me know in the comments!


Goodreads | Twitter | Tumblr | Instagram | Bloglovin’