T5W | Side Ships

Welcome one and all to this week’s Top 5 Wednesday post! For those of you who don’t know Top 5 Wednesday is a weekly meme/challenge which was created by the wonderful Lainey from gingereadslainey and is now overseen by the equally lovely Sam from Thoughts of Tomes. Every Wednesday, participants devise their Top 5 based on a given topic.

This Wednesday’s topic is Side Ships – tell us your favourite relationships that don’t involve the protagonist! Although I try to hide it, I am just a huge romantic masquerading as a cynic and shipping is when that tendency is given truly free reign. So obviously I have side ships, I have all kinds of ships, but side ships are the best, let’s be real here.

And, in case you’re concerned about this kind of thing, in this post there are (kind of) spoilers for A Darker Shade of Magic, Harry Potter, Six of Crows, and Pride and Prejudice (does a 200-year old book still need a spoiler warning?). 

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Six Degrees of Separation | Fates and Furies

It’s that time, folks, I bring you another Six Degrees of Separation, book-style! If you don’t know what this meme is then see my previous post or the creator’s website for more details. Basically, every month a book is chosen and participants have to get as far away from the book as possible in six steps. Here are my (somewhat belated) efforts…

This month’s chain begins with a book I’ve actually read (and adored): Lauren Groff’s Fates and Furies. This tells the story of the relationship of Lotto and Mathilde and their seemingly perfect marriage. As is all too often the case, there are two sides to every story and their marriage turns out to be a little… turbulent.

Speaking of turbulent and not-as-it-seems marriages, Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl is pretty much the epitome of unreliable narrator. (Or so I’m told, I never actually made it past 50 or so pages when I tried to read it) The 2014 film adaptation of it starred Rosamund Pike as the perfect wife, Amy. She has also previously starred in a 2005 book-to-film adaptation of…

Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, as directed by Joe Wright, which I love and thought she was the perfect Jane Bennet, but I digress… Pride and Prejudice is considered a classic of the 19th century, just like…

Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte, a story that tells the tale of the eponymous Jane from orphanhood to a position as governess at Thornfield Hall where she falls for the stern Mr Rochester. It’s a book I never “got”, I read it and it was fine but I don’t think I appreciated it as I should have (maybe I should give it a re-read now I’m older?) The bits of it I did enjoy, however, were the Gothic-y elements, as I seem to like my books with a slight Gothic trend. Unsurprisingly, then, this next Gothic-y book is high on my TBR…

Frances Hardinge’s The Lie Tree, ostensibly a children’s book which won the Costa Book of the Year Award in 2015. The main character, Faith, is a young girl with an interest in science (so I gather from the book’s synopsis). Another “Costa” winner (it was previously called the Whitbread Book Award until 2006) from 2001 which was the first “children’s” book to win the Award…

… and featured a strong young lady named Lyra, whose story is told in The Amber Spyglass by Philip Pullman, the third book in the His Dark Materials trilogy. The book takes place in cities in parallel worlds, not unlike…

V.E. Schwab’s A Darker Shade of Magic, the first in her Shades of Magic trilogy which tells of a very unique traveller, Kell, an ambassador to the royal family who is able to travel between parallel versions of a city called “London” situated in very different worlds which have different amounts of magic. I adore these books and am eagerly anticipating the final book in the trilogy, A Conjuring of Light, which is released tomorrow!

And there we have it, folks, from Fates and Furies to A Darker Shade of Magic, as easy as that! I highly encourage you to try it out this little game for yourself and share in the comments below or link to your own Six Degrees post.


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Six Degrees of Separation | The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo

That’s right, folks, I bring you another Six Degrees of Separation, book-style! If you don’t know what this meme is then see my previous post or the creator’s website for more details. Basically, every month a book is chosen and participants have to get as far away from the book as possible in six steps. Here is my efforts…

This month’s chain begins with Nordic thriller, The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, written by Stieg Larsson, a book which features a protagonist, Lisbeth Salander, who has a photographic/eidetic memory, just like…

Robert Langdon from Dan Brown’s Da Vinci Code/Angels & Demons (amongst others!), a film version of which starred the likes of Tom Hanks, Audrey Tatou and Paul Bettany.

Paul Bettany also appeared in the film A Knight’s Tale, in which he plays Geoffrey Chaucer. The film, though not the same, takes its title from Chaucer’s The Knight’s Tale from The Canterbury Tales, a work whose style also inspired…

Dan Simmons’ Hyperion, a sci-fi novel about an extra-planetary group of pilgrims which won the Hugo Award in 1990…

Similarly, the 2005 winner of the Hugo Award was Susanna Clarke’s Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrell, an alternate history novel in which the North-South divide in England, as figured during the Industrial Revolution, is inverted. This divide is also the subject of the nineteenth-century novel…

North and South by Elizabeth Gaskell, which tells of Southerner Margaret Hale’s move to an industrial city in the North of England, Milton, whose mills bring her into contact with Mr Thornton, a mill-owner whom she disagrees with intensely, creating an interesting dynamic which is not dissimilar to that of Elizabeth Bennet and Mr Darcy in…

Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice.

And there we have it, from Nordic thrillers, to a Middle English story collection, to novels featuring nineteenth-century magicians, mills, and marriage alike! Who would’ve thought it? 

I highly encourage you to try it out this little game for yourself and share in the comments below or link to your own Six Degrees post.


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T5W | Literary Fathers/Father Figures

top 5 wednesday

Welcome one, welcome all, to ‘Emma Remembers Top 5 Wednesdays Exists And Decides To Join In’. We all know how this show goes… but, for those who are unaware, Top 5 Wednesday is a weekly meme/challenge which was created by the wonderful Lainey from gingereadslainey and is now overseen by the equally lovely Sam from Thoughts of Tomes. Basically, every Wednesday, participants devise their Top 5 books based on a given topic – because who doesn’t love a good list?

This week’s topic is in honour of Father’s Day which, remember kids, is this coming Sunday (you’re welcome), and it’s the Top 5 Literary Fathers or Father Figures. It will surprise no one to learn that my mind immediately jumped to some of my favourite books, but I was mildly taken aback to realise how difficult it actually was for me to come up with 5 fathers/father figures who I thought were worthy of being included. Either there are a lot of absent fathers in the books I read or they just aren’t that great… I don’t know whether I should be concerned about that realisation! Minor crisis aside… let’s get back to the literary dads:

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Book Travelling Thursdays | Siblings

168709Book Travelling Thursdays is a weekly meme for book bloggers which celebrates the distance a book travels around the world through its covers in different countries. It was created by Catia and Danielle and you can visit the Goodreads group for more information.

This week’s topic is related to siblings: National Siblings Day is a few days away. Choose a book that has your favourite bookish siblings. Although I did toy with the idea of featuring the Weasleys from the Harry Potter series, I decided to go classical and pick the Bennets from Jane Austen’s Pride and PrejudiceThese siblings may not be perfect, they may annoy the hell out of each other, they may be so very different, but in my opinion they make up one of the most entertaining families to read about in literature. (The 2005 Joe Wright Pride and Prejudice film is the very best at portraying this family dynamic on-screen, I highly recommend it, even above the seminal 1995 BBC miniseries!)

Since I’m sure Pride and Prejudice needs no introduction I’ll just move straight on to the covers themselves…

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